Forgetting May Be Part of the Process of Remembering – New York Times

Dr Shock
June 5, 2007

Forgetting May Be Part of the Process of Remembering – New York Times
Interesting article in Nature Neuroscience.
In all, this research suggests that memories are more often crowded out than lost. An ideal memory improvement program, Dr. Anderson said, “would include a course on how to impair your memory. Your head is full of a surprising number of things that you don’t need to know.”

 

3 Responses to “Forgetting May Be Part of the Process of Remembering – New York Times”

  1. … that’s a quite impressive kind of holiday-literature, you’re carrying through Italy… (no detective pockets on board?). Anyway, very interesting subject, going to read it.

  2. manon on June 7th, 2007 at 10:55 am
  3. admin on October 21st, 2009 at 9:02 am
  4. Thank you so much for this article, as someone ‘recovering’ from PTSD, one major symptom being ‘memory – WHAT memory?’ – except for the traumatic ones of course – this resonates with my experience of being more or less consciously aware sometimes of ‘going into a tunnel’ in order to be able to focus/cope, and being unware of what’s going on outside that tunnel including things that have happened that do not help with the current task – only now, 2yrs after some treatment (short-term CBT only), are some memories long-forgotten coming back, as well as the function of short-term and nominal memory, which are different from this memory ‘suppression’ – Encouraging stuff

  5. Debbie Thomas on April 27th, 2010 at 3:16 am
  1. … that’s a quite impressive kind of holiday-literature, you’re carrying through Italy… (no detective pockets on board?). Anyway, very interesting subject, going to read it.

  2. manon on June 7th, 2007 at 10:55 am
  3. admin on October 21st, 2009 at 9:02 am
  4. Thank you so much for this article, as someone ‘recovering’ from PTSD, one major symptom being ‘memory – WHAT memory?’ – except for the traumatic ones of course – this resonates with my experience of being more or less consciously aware sometimes of ‘going into a tunnel’ in order to be able to focus/cope, and being unware of what’s going on outside that tunnel including things that have happened that do not help with the current task – only now, 2yrs after some treatment (short-term CBT only), are some memories long-forgotten coming back, as well as the function of short-term and nominal memory, which are different from this memory ‘suppression’ – Encouraging stuff

  5. Debbie Thomas on April 27th, 2010 at 3:16 am
  1. … that’s a quite impressive kind of holiday-literature, you’re carrying through Italy… (no detective pockets on board?). Anyway, very interesting subject, going to read it.

  2. manon on June 7th, 2007 at 10:55 am
  3. admin on October 21st, 2009 at 9:02 am
  4. Thank you so much for this article, as someone ‘recovering’ from PTSD, one major symptom being ‘memory – WHAT memory?’ – except for the traumatic ones of course – this resonates with my experience of being more or less consciously aware sometimes of ‘going into a tunnel’ in order to be able to focus/cope, and being unware of what’s going on outside that tunnel including things that have happened that do not help with the current task – only now, 2yrs after some treatment (short-term CBT only), are some memories long-forgotten coming back, as well as the function of short-term and nominal memory, which are different from this memory ‘suppression’ – Encouraging stuff

  5. Debbie Thomas on April 27th, 2010 at 3:16 am

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