China Photographs All Internet Cafe Customers

Dr Shock
October 19, 2008

internet cafe china

The Olympic games have finished so now it is time to reinstall censorship on Internet use in China. In a comment on a recent post about Computer Game Play in China the commenter proclaimed that censorship in China was severely exaggerated.

Since recent:

ALL visitors to internet cafés in Beijing will be required to have their photographs taken in a stringent new control on the public use of cyberspace. All photographs and scanned identity cards will be entered into a city-wide database run by the Cultural Law Enforcement Taskforce. The details will be available in any internet café.

Objections to this new rule have most probably been deleted from the Internet:

The Times searched for online comments on the rules but was unable to find any — often a sign that most commentary has been critical and has therefore been erased. However, a survey by the internet version of the People’s Daily showed that 72 per cent of respondents were opposed to the measure, calling it an infringement of their rights. Just over 26 per cent supported the photographing because it would benefit children.

From The Australian, online newspaper of the year

 

3 Responses to “China Photographs All Internet Cafe Customers”

  1. I read the news before and pay no attention.It’s true. But I always think there are more important problems to be focused than Internet censorship.

    It’s said that People’s Daily showed that 72 per cent of respondents were opposed to the measure. How many people join this survey? What right was infringed they thought? The right of freedom? or just waste of time?

    I said the censorship was exaggerated because the content and comment of your post”China’s Crackdown on Internet” http://www.shockmd.com/2008/02/12/chinas-crackdown-on-internet/

    “Anonymous blogging is forbidden in China”—absolute false.
    “Unlicensed Internet cafes and online pornography will also be attacked”—-I think it’s reasonable.
    “online video game playing is used as excuse to block the Internet”—-I haven’t heard about that.
    “It will be interesting to see how the Chinese government keeps track or censors their olympic visitors who may be using computers and cell phones etc. to relay messages from Bejing about China during the Olympics”—-Did it happen? Prejudice.

    In China, some websites(for example, porn) are really blocked and some contents are forbidden in Internet.But I don’t think this disturb my daily life.

    “The Times searched for online comments on the rules but was unable to find any — often a sign that most commentary has been critical and has therefore been erased.”
    Only bad aspects of China internet were mentioned–a sign that the Times didn’t tell all the facts.

  2. Nan Li on October 23rd, 2008 at 6:04 am
  3. I didn’t want to argue on this topic seriously. We are both doctors and should talk more about medicine.
    I just tell my opinion on Chinese Internet, as a user of it.

  4. Nan Li on October 23rd, 2008 at 6:12 am
  5. [...] the Chinese government tried to get a grip on Internet by forbidding anonymous blogging and even photographing those who want to enter an Internet cafe. They even tried to get a hold on You Tube and [...]

  6. Chinese Government trying to get control on Internet | Dr Shock MD PhD on June 30th, 2009 at 8:44 am
  1. I read the news before and pay no attention.It’s true. But I always think there are more important problems to be focused than Internet censorship.

    It’s said that People’s Daily showed that 72 per cent of respondents were opposed to the measure. How many people join this survey? What right was infringed they thought? The right of freedom? or just waste of time?

    I said the censorship was exaggerated because the content and comment of your post”China’s Crackdown on Internet” http://www.shockmd.com/2008/02/12/chinas-crackdown-on-internet/

    “Anonymous blogging is forbidden in China”—absolute false.
    “Unlicensed Internet cafes and online pornography will also be attacked”—-I think it’s reasonable.
    “online video game playing is used as excuse to block the Internet”—-I haven’t heard about that.
    “It will be interesting to see how the Chinese government keeps track or censors their olympic visitors who may be using computers and cell phones etc. to relay messages from Bejing about China during the Olympics”—-Did it happen? Prejudice.

    In China, some websites(for example, porn) are really blocked and some contents are forbidden in Internet.But I don’t think this disturb my daily life.

    “The Times searched for online comments on the rules but was unable to find any — often a sign that most commentary has been critical and has therefore been erased.”
    Only bad aspects of China internet were mentioned–a sign that the Times didn’t tell all the facts.

  2. Nan Li on October 23rd, 2008 at 6:04 am
  3. I didn’t want to argue on this topic seriously. We are both doctors and should talk more about medicine.
    I just tell my opinion on Chinese Internet, as a user of it.

  4. Nan Li on October 23rd, 2008 at 6:12 am
  5. [...] the Chinese government tried to get a grip on Internet by forbidding anonymous blogging and even photographing those who want to enter an Internet cafe. They even tried to get a hold on You Tube and [...]

  6. Chinese Government trying to get control on Internet | Dr Shock MD PhD on June 30th, 2009 at 8:44 am
  1. I read the news before and pay no attention.It’s true. But I always think there are more important problems to be focused than Internet censorship.

    It’s said that People’s Daily showed that 72 per cent of respondents were opposed to the measure. How many people join this survey? What right was infringed they thought? The right of freedom? or just waste of time?

    I said the censorship was exaggerated because the content and comment of your post”China’s Crackdown on Internet” http://www.shockmd.com/2008/02/12/chinas-crackdown-on-internet/

    “Anonymous blogging is forbidden in China”—absolute false.
    “Unlicensed Internet cafes and online pornography will also be attacked”—-I think it’s reasonable.
    “online video game playing is used as excuse to block the Internet”—-I haven’t heard about that.
    “It will be interesting to see how the Chinese government keeps track or censors their olympic visitors who may be using computers and cell phones etc. to relay messages from Bejing about China during the Olympics”—-Did it happen? Prejudice.

    In China, some websites(for example, porn) are really blocked and some contents are forbidden in Internet.But I don’t think this disturb my daily life.

    “The Times searched for online comments on the rules but was unable to find any — often a sign that most commentary has been critical and has therefore been erased.”
    Only bad aspects of China internet were mentioned–a sign that the Times didn’t tell all the facts.

  2. Nan Li on October 23rd, 2008 at 6:04 am
  3. I didn’t want to argue on this topic seriously. We are both doctors and should talk more about medicine.
    I just tell my opinion on Chinese Internet, as a user of it.

  4. Nan Li on October 23rd, 2008 at 6:12 am
  5. [...] the Chinese government tried to get a grip on Internet by forbidding anonymous blogging and even photographing those who want to enter an Internet cafe. They even tried to get a hold on You Tube and [...]

  6. Chinese Government trying to get control on Internet | Dr Shock MD PhD on June 30th, 2009 at 8:44 am

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