When to make PowerPoint slides available to students?

Dr Shock
March 12, 2009

medical education

Normally I am used to put the slides of my lectures online on BlackBoard before the actual lecture. In this way the hand outs can be used to understand the material better, at least that is what I hope for. Others never give their slides to students because they’re afraid the students will not attend the lectures when in possession of the slides. Still others put them online just after the lecture. Now which is best?

Providing the slides before the lecture has advantages according to recent published research:

  • Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.
  • On average, students in the classes where slides were posted before lecture reviewed notes after lecture more often, than did students in classes where slides were posted after the lecture.
  • Significant main effects showed that classes in which slides were posted before lecture had greater satisfaction with the timing of slide availability, greater satisfaction with the amount of material on the slides, and greater overall satisfaction with the slides than classes in which slides were posted after lecture.
  • The students in the before-lecture class had a significantly higher mean proportion of participation than did participators in the after-lecture class. The class that had access to lecture slides before lecture had a greater average participation rate per person than did the class that could only access the slides after class. This finding is consistent with the idea that having lecture slides for note-taking during class frees up students’ attention for other classroom activities.
  • Also class attendance was found to be considerably higher in the class that had slides available before lecture than in the class that could only access lecture slides after class. Posting the slides before class has a forewarning function, they may alert students to material with which they expect to have difficulty and thus encourage them to attend lecture.
  • Students prefer having lecture slides to use as a note-taking guide because it helps direct their attention to key information in the lecture, and because they can add their own ideas to these critical points as the lecture progresses

The groups didn’t differ in the number of downloads. The slides available before lecture were downloaded as much as those available after the lecture and also the timing of slide availability did not significantly affect students’ exam scores in either of these two types of courses. This last outcome was surprising, especially because students reported that they felt their studying and exam performance was better when they had the slides before lecture. Exam performance is more likely to be determined by several different factors working in combination such as individual learning styles and studying practices also contribute to how well students perform on exams.

How was this study done?

In this study, students in an introductory Research Methods course and a fourth-year Cognitive Development course, both taught in the Fall and Winter semesters, were provided with PowerPoint lecture slides either before lecture or after lecture. Course material was held constant within each type of class. We collected outcome measures of attendance, class participation, and exam performance. At the end of the semester, students completed surveys containing questions about how they used the slides and their perceptions about the slides. We also obtained information
about students’ attendance in other classes during the semester. We then examined whether providing lecture slides online before class or after class contributed to differences in the outcome measures, as well as contributing to how students used and perceived the lecture slides.

When do you make your slides available? Since before or after lecture availability doesn’t influence exam performance why bother?

slides are simply another tool that must be incorporated into effective study strategies.

ResearchBlogging.org
Kimberley A. Babb, Craig Ross (2009). The timing of online lecture slide availability and its effect on attendance, participation, and exam performance Computers & Education, 52 (4), 868-881 DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2008.12.009

 

15 Responses to “When to make PowerPoint slides available to students?”

  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am
  1. Interesting post!!

  2. Dr. Deb on March 12th, 2009 at 1:00 pm
  3. [...] in Computers & Education 52.4 [Edge Hill Library link]. Walter van den Broek has written a good overview, but very basicaly the authors found that when slides were available before the lecture there was [...]

  4. CAKES: learning technology blog » Blog Archive » Presentation Slides and Learning in Lectures on March 12th, 2009 at 2:11 pm
  5. I think one problem is that some lecturers just read the slides. That’s not what PowerPoint is for; if the students can get your slides and not turn up to your lecture and still have everything, UR DOIN IT RONG. PowerPoint slides should have titles for the main talking points, diagrams, pictures… not screeds of text. Students often print them off with the slides and, beside them, a lined area to write notes on what the lecturer is actually saying, and they should have to use that area to get all the material in their notes, not just print them off.

    I say this, of course, as a student who doesn’t take notes.

  6. wazza on March 12th, 2009 at 3:01 pm
  7. One more thing I would add. It helps keep students engaged in the class if your powerpoint slides have blanks on them that the students have to fill-in. If the professor provides everything on each slide, students tend to go into a daze and not take any notes and lose attention.

  8. Dick Marston on March 12th, 2009 at 6:16 pm
  9. First off, I know that the plural of anecdote is not data, but I think having anecdotes are good way of relating to data.
    As a relatively recent college grad, I’ve dealt with professors with all sorts of slide philosophies – as well as students of all types.

    It makes sense to me that, no matter if the slides were distributed before or after, they would be downloaded the same number of times. Of the students I know that would look at the slides, they would either look at them as soon as possible, or look at them just before a test; in either case, those who would check the slides do, and those who wouldn’t, don’t.
    “Most students reported using the slides as a guide for note-taking while students to which the slides were only available after the lecture used them instead of their notes or as a double check on their notes made during the lecture.” This is very, very true, and very helpful for me as a student. Sitting in a class, with the slides in front of me, allows me to write down only that what is unclear, uncertain, or unlisted in the slides. As a result, I would spend less time scratching down notes, and more time listening and trying to interact.
    I would personally dispute the finding of pre-posting the slides leads to a forewarning function. The students who would access the slides before class – and thus would be forewarned about the content – are not those who would be likely to skip class. I would want to check the correlation between those who accessed the slides before an exam ‘cram period’ and their attendance. My general observation is if a student cares enough to access slides before they ‘need’ to, they care enough to attend class frequently. I would rather associate the class attendance discrepancy with the fact that participation is increased. In my experience, students skip class if both (a) they can otherwise find out what was going on, and (b) they have more entertaining/important things to do (whether it’s hang out with friends, or do work for other classes). If you know that there’s a lot of active discussion and participation going on, that makes the class more entertaining than simply having slides read to you, and thus decreases (b).
    The slides don’t need to be – and in fact, shouldn’t be – 100% comprehensive. In math classes, it’s a good idea for the professor to show the example problem in the slides, and keep that up while solving the problem (or letting the students take a swing at the problem first). It gets back to the whole participation issue.
    In any case, great post, and an interesting study!

  10. Parse on March 12th, 2009 at 6:32 pm
  11. @Dick
    Nice suggestion

  12. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:54 pm
  13. @wazza
    I mostly use the without bullet points approach, no complaints until now from my students. Kind regards Dr shock

  14. Dr Shock on March 12th, 2009 at 8:57 pm
  15. Great post and just what my lecturer husband was pondering the other day – have forwarded the link to him.

  16. Buckeyebrit on March 12th, 2009 at 9:40 pm
  17. Didn’t test which group actually learnt more, though. I’ve been told that the to optimise learning you should look at notes the next day, then the next week, and then the next month. To ensure that you get the information from short term into long term memory.

    Don’t know if that’s true or not (although my personal experience is that looking at notes the next day makes a lot of difference). But if so then the best option would be to do whatever it takes to get the students to look at notes the best day.

    Anway, according to your bullet 2. The bottom line is that notes before class would be most effective (if the hypothese is true, of course…)

  18. tomrees on March 13th, 2009 at 12:29 am
  19. [...] this one – which is about teaching and what some research says about how to do it.  And this, which is a reminder of how the stuff researchers find out about the brain connects to [...]

  20. Why I love the ResearchBlogs twitter feed « info-fetishist on March 13th, 2009 at 11:04 pm
  21. [...] nyt sitten Twitter-seikkailujeni seurauksena päädyin lukemaan erään postauksen siitä milloin luentoslidet tulisi opiskelijoille julkaista. Postauksessa referoitiin Computers [...]

  22. Marjan blogi » Luentomateriaalit opiskelijoille - milloin ja millaista? on March 17th, 2009 at 3:07 pm
  23. I am just using images on my PowerPoints now & trying to get away from using them as teaching tools so they are not a ‘crutch’ for me…easier said than done some times :)

  24. Sarah Stewart on November 1st, 2009 at 3:46 am
  25. Your very experienced and busy with your work, you can do it, did you enjoy using pictures, did it help you get your message across. Always happy when students get the clou instead of all the details which they can find online, in their books or anywhere else, take care,
    Dr Shock

  26. Dr Shock on November 1st, 2009 at 2:05 pm
  27. I must admit there is always the complaint that I didn’t regurgitate their textbooks, but I always send them back to their textbooks & resources. What I like about using little or no text is that I am ‘freed’ to really talk & discuss my subject which I think makes for a far more interesting session for students. :)

  28. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:18 am
  29. And what I should have added is that when I put my powerpoint online with nothing but images, I add audio so students can make sense of the presentation.

  30. Sarah Stewart on November 2nd, 2009 at 12:19 am

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