A Cracking Grand Rounds

Dr Shock
August 5, 2009

Wallace and gromit

An extensive grand round with a lot of posts in a funny theme on Emergiblog:

Our theme this week comes to us courtesy of that loveable, wacky duo, Wallace and Gromit! Many, many submissions make for a wonderful ‘Rounds and this week is no exception.

I especially liked:

Parents Are Concerned about Psychiatric Medications
Concern about the use of psychiatric medication for children: an underlying factor in negative public response is lack of acceptance that serious mental illness exists among children and adolescents

On ACP Internist a post about bleu M&M’s and spinal cord injury. Scientists at the University of Rochester suspect the blue dye used in M&Ms and Gatorade may interrupt the cell death that follows spinal cord injury.

jdt_bluerat

A must read on Laika’s MedLibLog Clinical Reader, a Fancy New Aggregator – But All is not Gold that Glitters. Or how the web 2.0 can mislead you and on the other hand can help discover misleading initiatives. It’s all about accountability and credibility.

On Dr Ottematic about Resident Physicians:

Who is this young, inexperienced, excessively thorough, very slow-to-get-things-done but has-a-lot-of-time-to listen person standing before them? I’m a Resident Physician. I’m “the future face of medicine.”

 

5 Responses to “A Cracking Grand Rounds”

  1. Thanks for reading and sharing my post; there’s a lot more to it than what I wrote, but a lot of it doesn’t matter from the patient perspective. Grand Rounds was pretty epic this week, so it’s very kind of you to pick up on mine out of the bunch of excellent submissions. Cheers!

  2. Jessica Otte on August 5th, 2009 at 9:36 am
  3. I’m glad you liked my post. It means a lot coming from a colleague. Thank you for sharing it with others.

  4. Child Psych on August 5th, 2009 at 4:12 pm
  5. The Blue Dye article says, “So the researchers injected it in mice following spinal cord injury, which were able to limp again compared to controls, who never regained mobility, they reported. The mice did have to deal with a temporary blue tinge.

    Because you can’t inject a human who’s just had a spinal injury, scientists are searching for a way to administer the dye into the body”

    Do you know why you can inject mice and not people? Just curious.

    Very interesting…I’m going out to buy myself a huge box of M&M’s so I can seperate all the blue ones from all the packs and store them in my freezer…just in case..ha,ha.

  6. aqua on August 5th, 2009 at 5:04 pm
  7. Good question, had to do some searching didn’t know the answer myself. For 2 reasons as explained by one of the researchers “First, no one wants to put a needle into a spinal cord that has just been severely injured, so we knew we needed to find another way to quickly deliver an agent that would stop ATP from killing healthy motor neurons. Second, the compound we initially used, oxidized ATP, cannot be injected into the bloodstream because of its dangerous side effects.”

    Glad I gave you an excuse to buy some proper chocolate sweets;)
    Take care Dr Shock

  8. Dr Shock on August 5th, 2009 at 5:22 pm
  9. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  10. Science Report » Blog Archive » A Cracking Grand Rounds on August 6th, 2009 at 3:30 am
  1. Thanks for reading and sharing my post; there’s a lot more to it than what I wrote, but a lot of it doesn’t matter from the patient perspective. Grand Rounds was pretty epic this week, so it’s very kind of you to pick up on mine out of the bunch of excellent submissions. Cheers!

  2. Jessica Otte on August 5th, 2009 at 9:36 am
  3. I’m glad you liked my post. It means a lot coming from a colleague. Thank you for sharing it with others.

  4. Child Psych on August 5th, 2009 at 4:12 pm
  5. The Blue Dye article says, “So the researchers injected it in mice following spinal cord injury, which were able to limp again compared to controls, who never regained mobility, they reported. The mice did have to deal with a temporary blue tinge.

    Because you can’t inject a human who’s just had a spinal injury, scientists are searching for a way to administer the dye into the body”

    Do you know why you can inject mice and not people? Just curious.

    Very interesting…I’m going out to buy myself a huge box of M&M’s so I can seperate all the blue ones from all the packs and store them in my freezer…just in case..ha,ha.

  6. aqua on August 5th, 2009 at 5:04 pm
  7. Good question, had to do some searching didn’t know the answer myself. For 2 reasons as explained by one of the researchers “First, no one wants to put a needle into a spinal cord that has just been severely injured, so we knew we needed to find another way to quickly deliver an agent that would stop ATP from killing healthy motor neurons. Second, the compound we initially used, oxidized ATP, cannot be injected into the bloodstream because of its dangerous side effects.”

    Glad I gave you an excuse to buy some proper chocolate sweets;)
    Take care Dr Shock

  8. Dr Shock on August 5th, 2009 at 5:22 pm
  9. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  10. Science Report » Blog Archive » A Cracking Grand Rounds on August 6th, 2009 at 3:30 am
  1. Thanks for reading and sharing my post; there’s a lot more to it than what I wrote, but a lot of it doesn’t matter from the patient perspective. Grand Rounds was pretty epic this week, so it’s very kind of you to pick up on mine out of the bunch of excellent submissions. Cheers!

  2. Jessica Otte on August 5th, 2009 at 9:36 am
  3. I’m glad you liked my post. It means a lot coming from a colleague. Thank you for sharing it with others.

  4. Child Psych on August 5th, 2009 at 4:12 pm
  5. The Blue Dye article says, “So the researchers injected it in mice following spinal cord injury, which were able to limp again compared to controls, who never regained mobility, they reported. The mice did have to deal with a temporary blue tinge.

    Because you can’t inject a human who’s just had a spinal injury, scientists are searching for a way to administer the dye into the body”

    Do you know why you can inject mice and not people? Just curious.

    Very interesting…I’m going out to buy myself a huge box of M&M’s so I can seperate all the blue ones from all the packs and store them in my freezer…just in case..ha,ha.

  6. aqua on August 5th, 2009 at 5:04 pm
  7. Good question, had to do some searching didn’t know the answer myself. For 2 reasons as explained by one of the researchers “First, no one wants to put a needle into a spinal cord that has just been severely injured, so we knew we needed to find another way to quickly deliver an agent that would stop ATP from killing healthy motor neurons. Second, the compound we initially used, oxidized ATP, cannot be injected into the bloodstream because of its dangerous side effects.”

    Glad I gave you an excuse to buy some proper chocolate sweets;)
    Take care Dr Shock

  8. Dr Shock on August 5th, 2009 at 5:22 pm
  9. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  10. Science Report » Blog Archive » A Cracking Grand Rounds on August 6th, 2009 at 3:30 am
  1. Thanks for reading and sharing my post; there’s a lot more to it than what I wrote, but a lot of it doesn’t matter from the patient perspective. Grand Rounds was pretty epic this week, so it’s very kind of you to pick up on mine out of the bunch of excellent submissions. Cheers!

  2. Jessica Otte on August 5th, 2009 at 9:36 am
  3. I’m glad you liked my post. It means a lot coming from a colleague. Thank you for sharing it with others.

  4. Child Psych on August 5th, 2009 at 4:12 pm
  5. The Blue Dye article says, “So the researchers injected it in mice following spinal cord injury, which were able to limp again compared to controls, who never regained mobility, they reported. The mice did have to deal with a temporary blue tinge.

    Because you can’t inject a human who’s just had a spinal injury, scientists are searching for a way to administer the dye into the body”

    Do you know why you can inject mice and not people? Just curious.

    Very interesting…I’m going out to buy myself a huge box of M&M’s so I can seperate all the blue ones from all the packs and store them in my freezer…just in case..ha,ha.

  6. aqua on August 5th, 2009 at 5:04 pm
  7. Good question, had to do some searching didn’t know the answer myself. For 2 reasons as explained by one of the researchers “First, no one wants to put a needle into a spinal cord that has just been severely injured, so we knew we needed to find another way to quickly deliver an agent that would stop ATP from killing healthy motor neurons. Second, the compound we initially used, oxidized ATP, cannot be injected into the bloodstream because of its dangerous side effects.”

    Glad I gave you an excuse to buy some proper chocolate sweets;)
    Take care Dr Shock

  8. Dr Shock on August 5th, 2009 at 5:22 pm
  9. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  10. Science Report » Blog Archive » A Cracking Grand Rounds on August 6th, 2009 at 3:30 am
  1. Thanks for reading and sharing my post; there’s a lot more to it than what I wrote, but a lot of it doesn’t matter from the patient perspective. Grand Rounds was pretty epic this week, so it’s very kind of you to pick up on mine out of the bunch of excellent submissions. Cheers!

  2. Jessica Otte on August 5th, 2009 at 9:36 am
  3. I’m glad you liked my post. It means a lot coming from a colleague. Thank you for sharing it with others.

  4. Child Psych on August 5th, 2009 at 4:12 pm
  5. The Blue Dye article says, “So the researchers injected it in mice following spinal cord injury, which were able to limp again compared to controls, who never regained mobility, they reported. The mice did have to deal with a temporary blue tinge.

    Because you can’t inject a human who’s just had a spinal injury, scientists are searching for a way to administer the dye into the body”

    Do you know why you can inject mice and not people? Just curious.

    Very interesting…I’m going out to buy myself a huge box of M&M’s so I can seperate all the blue ones from all the packs and store them in my freezer…just in case..ha,ha.

  6. aqua on August 5th, 2009 at 5:04 pm
  7. Good question, had to do some searching didn’t know the answer myself. For 2 reasons as explained by one of the researchers “First, no one wants to put a needle into a spinal cord that has just been severely injured, so we knew we needed to find another way to quickly deliver an agent that would stop ATP from killing healthy motor neurons. Second, the compound we initially used, oxidized ATP, cannot be injected into the bloodstream because of its dangerous side effects.”

    Glad I gave you an excuse to buy some proper chocolate sweets;)
    Take care Dr Shock

  8. Dr Shock on August 5th, 2009 at 5:22 pm
  9. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  10. Science Report » Blog Archive » A Cracking Grand Rounds on August 6th, 2009 at 3:30 am

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