Medical Slang Explained

Dr Shock
August 10, 2009

Doctor woman

Jargon allows people in a certain field to speak succinctly, clearly and accurately to each other. Problems emerge when those who use jargon very often, have to explain what they’re doing to someone who is not part of their field. The medical profession is renowned for its jargon. Jargon has the advantage of talking to one another quickly and efficiently.

Slang should be distinguished from jargon, which is the technical vocabulary of a particular profession. Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speaker’s dialect or language.

Examples of medical slang, all found on slangRN.com

Medical students’ syndrome

Medical students’ syndrome is a temporary, hypochondria-like mental condition that strikes medical students, causing them to believe that they are suffering from the diseases that they’re studying. By some reports, up to 80% of medical students experience it at some point as a result of studying such frightening diseases in such a highly suggestible environment.

DBI

Dirt Bag Index. One interpretation of the formula is as follows: DBI = number of tattoos divided by number of missing teeth, multiplied by number of “tracks” added to estimated days without a bath!

You can vote and comment on the slang on slangRN.com.

Related post on this blog:

Pimping Med Students

 

4 Responses to “Medical Slang Explained”

  1. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  2. Science Report » Blog Archive » Medical Slang Explained on August 10th, 2009 at 6:03 pm
  3. The whole idea that there is a DBI concerns me, and makes me sad, especially given drug addiction is an illness and often the result of a young life full of addiction, abuse, or neglect. So often the people who are homeless, or have not bathed in days are mentally ill too.

    I was in the emergency room with severe hepatitis symptoms for 6 days one time. The police brought in a woman who was severely psychotic. All night I could hear the nurses and doctors making fun of her screaming to get out of the ER’s locked unit. I cried so hard thinking how cruel and uninformed they were. What if that woman were me. Having seen and heard how she was treated I have an intense fear about seeking help at a hospital, even if I am feeling acutely suicidal.

  4. aqua on August 10th, 2009 at 8:01 pm
  5. I don’t think we have the same people in mind as far as the DBI is concerned. I agree with you that some ER’s are not very well equipped for psychiatric patients and personnel not always adequately trained for the acute care of psychiatric patients but the DBI wasn’t meant for them. Not all people visiting the ER come there with good intent. Take care Dr Shock

  6. Dr Shock on August 10th, 2009 at 10:18 pm
  7. slangRN.com is a great new site. I’m trying to break into the field of medical device sales and there is so much lingo that I’ve been able to reference on slangRN. Keep on rocking in the free world.

  8. Ryan on August 31st, 2009 at 5:47 am
  1. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  2. Science Report » Blog Archive » Medical Slang Explained on August 10th, 2009 at 6:03 pm
  3. The whole idea that there is a DBI concerns me, and makes me sad, especially given drug addiction is an illness and often the result of a young life full of addiction, abuse, or neglect. So often the people who are homeless, or have not bathed in days are mentally ill too.

    I was in the emergency room with severe hepatitis symptoms for 6 days one time. The police brought in a woman who was severely psychotic. All night I could hear the nurses and doctors making fun of her screaming to get out of the ER’s locked unit. I cried so hard thinking how cruel and uninformed they were. What if that woman were me. Having seen and heard how she was treated I have an intense fear about seeking help at a hospital, even if I am feeling acutely suicidal.

  4. aqua on August 10th, 2009 at 8:01 pm
  5. I don’t think we have the same people in mind as far as the DBI is concerned. I agree with you that some ER’s are not very well equipped for psychiatric patients and personnel not always adequately trained for the acute care of psychiatric patients but the DBI wasn’t meant for them. Not all people visiting the ER come there with good intent. Take care Dr Shock

  6. Dr Shock on August 10th, 2009 at 10:18 pm
  7. slangRN.com is a great new site. I’m trying to break into the field of medical device sales and there is so much lingo that I’ve been able to reference on slangRN. Keep on rocking in the free world.

  8. Ryan on August 31st, 2009 at 5:47 am
  1. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  2. Science Report » Blog Archive » Medical Slang Explained on August 10th, 2009 at 6:03 pm
  3. The whole idea that there is a DBI concerns me, and makes me sad, especially given drug addiction is an illness and often the result of a young life full of addiction, abuse, or neglect. So often the people who are homeless, or have not bathed in days are mentally ill too.

    I was in the emergency room with severe hepatitis symptoms for 6 days one time. The police brought in a woman who was severely psychotic. All night I could hear the nurses and doctors making fun of her screaming to get out of the ER’s locked unit. I cried so hard thinking how cruel and uninformed they were. What if that woman were me. Having seen and heard how she was treated I have an intense fear about seeking help at a hospital, even if I am feeling acutely suicidal.

  4. aqua on August 10th, 2009 at 8:01 pm
  5. I don’t think we have the same people in mind as far as the DBI is concerned. I agree with you that some ER’s are not very well equipped for psychiatric patients and personnel not always adequately trained for the acute care of psychiatric patients but the DBI wasn’t meant for them. Not all people visiting the ER come there with good intent. Take care Dr Shock

  6. Dr Shock on August 10th, 2009 at 10:18 pm
  7. slangRN.com is a great new site. I’m trying to break into the field of medical device sales and there is so much lingo that I’ve been able to reference on slangRN. Keep on rocking in the free world.

  8. Ryan on August 31st, 2009 at 5:47 am
  1. [...] Go to Publisher to continue reading [...]

  2. Science Report » Blog Archive » Medical Slang Explained on August 10th, 2009 at 6:03 pm
  3. The whole idea that there is a DBI concerns me, and makes me sad, especially given drug addiction is an illness and often the result of a young life full of addiction, abuse, or neglect. So often the people who are homeless, or have not bathed in days are mentally ill too.

    I was in the emergency room with severe hepatitis symptoms for 6 days one time. The police brought in a woman who was severely psychotic. All night I could hear the nurses and doctors making fun of her screaming to get out of the ER’s locked unit. I cried so hard thinking how cruel and uninformed they were. What if that woman were me. Having seen and heard how she was treated I have an intense fear about seeking help at a hospital, even if I am feeling acutely suicidal.

  4. aqua on August 10th, 2009 at 8:01 pm
  5. I don’t think we have the same people in mind as far as the DBI is concerned. I agree with you that some ER’s are not very well equipped for psychiatric patients and personnel not always adequately trained for the acute care of psychiatric patients but the DBI wasn’t meant for them. Not all people visiting the ER come there with good intent. Take care Dr Shock

  6. Dr Shock on August 10th, 2009 at 10:18 pm
  7. slangRN.com is a great new site. I’m trying to break into the field of medical device sales and there is so much lingo that I’ve been able to reference on slangRN. Keep on rocking in the free world.

  8. Ryan on August 31st, 2009 at 5:47 am

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